Shame-based dogs

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Lents wrote. “Dogs have inherited this behavior and they will use it after any kind of infraction that results in being punished,” biologist Nathan H. “As social animals, they crave harmonious integration in the group and neglect or isolation is painful for them.”

That torn cushion, spilled garbage or cheeky pee always leads to one culprit: A hell-raising hound.

Psychology Today reports that young wolves even now use apology bows in social integration. And if one of the pups bites too hard, he’s spurned by the rest of the pack.

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When you yell, Rover’s reaction is almost always the same: Bowed low, big adoring eyes and tail between the legs. (GETTY IMAGES)

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To return to grace, they perform an apology bow.

We call it “dog shaming” while animal behaviorists call it an “apology bow.”

And when you yell, Rover’s reaction is almost always the same: Bowed low, big adoring eyes and tail between the legs.

Now, a new study says your pup’s reaction is hardwired into them as a survival tactic their wolf relatives used eons ago.

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